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See How Much It Costs to Charge an EV In Each State

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See How Much It Costs to Charge an EV In Each State

If you’re buying an EV, you’re probably wondering how much it will cost to charge your electric car. And, the cheapest option for charging electric vehicles. Some states are certainly more affordable than others. Keep reading to know how much it costs to charge an EV in each state.

A Few Quick Notes

Before we dive into how much it costs to charge an EV in each state, let’s take a quick second to talk about how we got our data, how we compare states, and more.

First, when it comes to the electric rates for each state, we used data from 2022. While electric costs may have raised between then and now, this is the most concrete data that could find.

Next, the cost to charge your electric vehicle will also vary based on the type of car and the battery size. For this, we will be measuring costs based on the Tesla Model X. This is by far one of the most popular and purchased/leased cars in the United States, making it easy to measure costs.

white Tesla Model X at Brussels Motor Show
Tesla Model X has falcon wing doors.

We will also examine how much it would cost if you charged your vehicle at home. Some states don’t have reliable (or very many) charging stations that drivers can use. Because of that, we will measure how long it would take and how much it would cost based on charging with a 60-amp wall connecter and charging the battery to full.

In this case, a Tesla Model X has a 100 kWh 410 V lithium-ion battery. With a 60-amp wall charger, the Model X can charge 11.5 kilowatts an hour and fully charge in 8.7 hours.

With all of those points in mind, let’s get into how much it costs to charge an EV in each state!

Alabama

Alabama is the first on our list. The average cost of residential electricity in the United States is $.16 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). Alabama is lower than the average at $.15 per kWh.

• Full charge cost: $15.00 based on 100kWh battery

Alaska

Alaska is one of the highest cost-of-living states in terms of electric rates. At an average of $.24 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), it would be much more costly to charge your car in Alaska.

• Full charge cost: $24.00 based on 100kWh battery

Arizona

Arizona falls under the national average, only charging around $.13 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), making it one of the cheapest states to charge your car.

• Full charge cost: $13.00 based on 100kWh battery

Arkansas

Arkansas is even lower than Arizona, averaging around $.125 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). While Arkansas isn’t on top of our list as one of the best states for EVs, it is cheap.

• Full charge cost: $12.50 based on 100kWh battery

California

California is known for being an expensive state to live in, and its electric rates are high as well. At $.254 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), it’s in the top five highest-cost states on our list. Also, remember that California charges extra for electricity during on-peak hours, which could cost you more!

• Full charge cost: $25.40 based on 100kWh battery

Colorado

Colorado is a great state to live in if you own an EV, and is also cheap if you want to charge your vehicle at home. At just $.149 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) it isn’t overly expensive to charge your electric car.

• Full charge cost: $14.90 based on 100kWh battery

Connecticut

Connecticut is another expensive state for charging an EV. Coming in at $.25 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) it’s fairly costly to charge your battery to full (but it may be cheaper than filling up the car with gas!).

• Full charge cost: $25 based on 100kWh battery

Delaware

Delaware isn’t the most expensive on our list, but not the cheapest state either. At $.16 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) it falls right in the middle when it comes to charging your car.

• Full charge cost: $16 based on 100kWh battery

Florida

It’s fairly cheap to charge your car in Florida, costing just $.142 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $14.20 based on 100kWh battery

Georgia

Georgia only charges about $.010 more than Florida, costing just $.143 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your car.

• Full charge cost: $14.30 based on 100kWh battery

Hawaii

Hawaii is the most expensive state to charge your EV on our list, costing $.448 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $44.80 based on 100kWh battery

Idaho

Idaho is one of the least expensive states to charge your electric car, costing $.11 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $11.00 based on 100kWh battery

Illinois

It costs around $.172 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an electric vehicle in Illinois.

• Full charge cost: $17.20 based on 100kWh battery

Indiana

Indiana is a bit behind Illinois in costs, charging only $.171 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an EV.

• Full charge cost: $17.10 based on 100kWh battery

Iowa

It costs around $.133 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an electric car in Iowa, which is slightly below the national average.

• Full charge cost: $13.30 based on 100kWh battery

Kansas

Kansas is only $.090 below the national average, charging $.151 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an electric car.

• Full charge cost: $15.10 based on 100kWh battery

Kentucky

solar-powered evs
Solar-powered EVs have a rechargeable battery, which stores solar energy.

Kentucky is a fairly cheap state to charge your electric car publicly and privately. It only costs around $.139 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an EV in the state.

• Full charge cost: $13.90 based on 100kWh battery

Louisiana

It will cost you around $.14 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an electric vehicle in the state of Louisiana.

• Full charge cost: $14.00 based on 100kWh battery

Maine

Maine is another expensive state to charge your electric car in. With electric costs at around $.23 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) and climbing, it can easily run up your bill.

• Full charge cost: $23.00 based on 100kWh battery

Maryland

It costs about $.158 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your EV battery in Maryland.

• Full charge cost: $15.80 based on 100kWh battery

Massachusetts

Massachusetts is the third most expensive state on this list to charge your car in. It costs $.262 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $26.20 based on 100kWh battery

Michigan

While Michigan is higher than the average in costs, it’s not even in the top 10 of the most expensive states on our list. It costs $.18 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your car in this state.

• Full charge cost: $18.00 based on 100kWh battery

Minnesota

It costs $.149 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your car in Minnesota, slightly below the national average.

• Full charge cost: $14.90 based on 100kWh battery

Mississippi

Mississippi charges $.134 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your car, almost 17% below the national average of $.16.

• Full charge cost: $13.40 based on 100kWh battery

Missouri

Missouri is the 8th cheapest state to charge your EV, costing only $.12 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $12.00 based on 100kWh battery

Montana

As the 9th cheapest state to charge your EV, Montana charges $.126 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $12.60 based on 100kWh battery

Nebraska

It’s fairly cheap to charge your electric vehicle in Nebraska, costing around $.12 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $12.00 based on 100kWh battery

Nevada

Nevada is 5% below the national electric cost average, charging around $.152 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $15.20 based on 100kWh battery

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is the second most expensive state for charging your EV on this list, charging $.304 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $30.40 based on 100kWh battery

New Jersey

New Jersey’s costs are slightly higher than the national average, costing around $.164 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $16.40 based on 100kWh battery

New Mexico

New Mexico only cost around $.146 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), lower than the national average.

• Full charge cost: $14.60 based on 100kWh battery

New York

While New York may be a costly state to live in, its electric costs are fairly low compared to some of the other expensive states on this list. The state charges approximately $.23 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). While that’s higher than the national average, it’s not as high as it could be.

• Full charge cost: $23.00 based on 100kWh battery

North Carolina

North Carolina costs around $.135 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). This puts the state in the top 20 of lower-costing states.

• Full charge cost: $13.50 based on 100kWh battery

North Dakota

North Dakota is the 4th cheapest state to charge an EV, only costing around $.117 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $11.70 based on 100kWh battery

Ohio

The electrical rate in Ohio is about $.152 per kilowatt-hour (kWh). This is 5% below the national average.

• Full charge cost: $15.20 based on 100kWh battery

Oklahoma

Oklahoma charges $.14 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), a decent 12.5% below the national average. However, they do have “peak” hours during the day and early evening that will charge more, depending on your area.

• Full charge cost: $14.00 based on 100kWh battery

Oregon

Oregon is the 5th cheapest state on this list, charging a mere $.119 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $11.90 based on 100kWh battery

Pennsylvania

It will cost you about $.176 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your EV in the state of Pennsylvania

• Full charge cost: $17.60 based on 100kWh battery

Rhode Island

Rhode Island is the 6th most expensive state to charge an electric vehicle in, costing around $.246 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $24.60 based on 100kWh battery

South Carolina

South Carolina is 17% cheaper than the national average when it comes to charging an EV. You’ll spend around $.132 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $13.20 based on 100kWh battery

South Dakota

While South Dakota doesn’t fall in the top ten cheapest states to charge an electric vehicle, it is affordable at just $.13 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $13.00 based on 100kWh battery

Tennessee

Tennessee also sits at $.13 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), making it an affordable state to have an EV in.

• Full charge cost: $13.00 based on 100kWh battery

Texas

Texas charges around $.147 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge an electric vehicle, but larger cities in the state will pay significantly more, sometimes upwards of $.24.

• Full charge cost: $14.70 based on 100kWh battery

Utah

Utah is the second cheapest state on our list, charging just $.109 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $10.90 based on 100kWh battery

Vermont

Vermont is a fairly expensive state to have an EV in, but at least they aren’t Hawaii. You’ll pay around $.21 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $21.00 based on 100kWh battery

Virginia

Virginia is 8.75% cheaper than the national average cost, charging just $.146 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $14.60 based on 100kWh battery

Washington

The cheapest state to own an electric vehicle and charge it in Washington! You’ll pay just $.104 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $10.40 based on 100kWh battery

West Virginia

West Virginia sits at $.14 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), 12.5% lower than the national average.

• Full charge cost: $14.00 based on 100kWh battery

Wisconsin

It will cost you about $.12 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) to charge your electric vehicle in the state of Wisconsin.

• Full charge cost: $12.00 based on 100kWh battery

Wyoming

At number 6 of the cheapest states to charge an EV, Wyoming charges $.12 per kilowatt-hour (kWh).

• Full charge cost: $12.00 based on 100kWh battery

Summary of the Cost of Charging an EV in Each State

StateFull Charge CostVs. Average Percentage
Alabama$15.006.25% Less
Alaska$24.0050.00% More
Arizona$13.0018.75% Less
Arkansas$12.5021.87% Less
California$25.4058.75% More
Colorado$14.906.87% Less
Connecticut$25.0056.25% More
Delaware$16.000% Difference
Florida$14.2011.25% Less
Georgia$14.3010.62% Less
Hawaii$44.80180.00% More
Idaho$11.0031.25% Less
Illinois$17.207.50% More
Indiana$17.106.87% More
Iowa$13.3016.87% Less
Kansas$15.105.62% Less
Kentucky$13.9013.12% Less
Louisiana$14.0012.50% Less
Maine$23.0043.75% More
Maryland$15.801.25% Less
Massachusetts$26.2063.75% More
Michigan$18.0012.50% More
Minnesota$14.906.87% Less
Mississippi$13.4016.25% Less
Missouri$12.0025.00% Less
Montana$12.6021.25% Less
Nebraska$12.0025.00% Less
Nevada$15.205.00% Less
New Hampshire$30.4090.00% More
New Jersey$16.402.50% More
New Mexico$14.608.75% Less
New York$23.0043.75% More
North Carolina$13.5015.62% Less
North Dakota$11.7026.87% Less
Ohio$15.205.00% Less
Oklahoma$14.0012.50% Less
Oregon$11.9025.62% Less
Pennsylvania$17.6010.00% More
Rhode Island$24.6053.75% More
South Carolina$13.2017.50% Less
South Dakota$13.0018.75% Less
Tennessee$13.0018.75% Less
Texas$14.708.12% Less
Utah$10.9031.87% Less
Vermont$21.0031.25% More
Virginia$14.608.75% Less
Washington$10.4035.00% Less
West Virginia$14.0012.50% Less
Wisconsin$12.0025.00% Less
Wyoming$12.0025.00% Less

Frequently Asked Questions

How much does it actually cost to charge an electric car?

Based on our data, anywhere from $10 to around $50 if charging your car at home.

How long does it take to fully charge an electric car?

Most cars (if charging via a Level 2 or fast charger) can charge fully in less than 12 hours.

Is it cheaper to charge an electric car at home or at a charging station?

Unless you exclusively charge your car at free stations, it will always be cheaper to charge your car at home. Many fast or super charging stations charge extra premiums for the ability to charge your car with their outlets.

Are electric charging stations free?

While there are many free charging stations, many also charge to use their outlets.

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