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6 Reasons I Would Avoid a Razer Leviathan V2

Buy Razer Leviathan V2

6 Reasons I Would Avoid a Razer Leviathan V2

Razer’s Leviathan V2 soundbar might look like a great way to upgrade your audio equipment, but it’s not as impressive as it first seems. This soundbar claims to be an affordable high-fidelity soundbar that will boost your audio experience to a studio level, but the reality is much more middling. Let’s examine why I’ve decided to avoid a Razer Leviathan V2.

It’s Too Expensive

The price is my number-one reason for choosing a different audio device over the Razer Leviathan V2. The soundbar comes with an MSRP of $249.99, around the same as an entry-level high-fidelity speaker system. However, compared to most high-fidelity speaker systems at that price point, the Leviathan doesn’t stack up.

For the same price, you can get bookshelf speakers with more transparency surrounding the efficacy of the components, specially designed parts, and overall better sound elements. The only thing that separates the Razer Leviathan V2 from similar high-fidelity sound equipment is the THX Spatial Audio. However, spatial audio is best experienced using headphones or a surround sound system. A soundbar with spatial audio might be cooler than one without, but you won’t even get the best possible spatial audio experience due to the form factor.

While the RGB LEDs might seem compelling, they aren’t unique to Razer products. You can get addressable RGB LEDs from other manufacturers such as Redragon. You can check out Redragon’s GS560 RGB soundbar in our list of alternatives below.

Components of Questionable Quality

Soundbar speaker
The Razer Leviathan V2 claims to have high-fidelity audio equipment but its tech specifications are middling.

While we generally accept that companies will produce their own components for most electronics, it’s good practice to want to buy products from companies that are transparent about the nature of the components they produce. While Razer gives you size measurements for the core components of the Leviathan V2, they don’t really tell you much beyond the bare minimum of size information.

Sizing is crucial information in audio equipment. However, there are many other factors we would have loved to see in the specification sheet regarding this product. Information such as the construction materials of each part plays a large role in the overall sound quality of the product. So, we must know that information to make an informed decision when purchasing, especially at this soundbar’s price point.

Razer sells its products based on software integration rather than hardware integration. Additionally, it isn’t an audio engineering company. While that’s not to say their products are low quality, the company doesn’t make its primary profit off audio devices. Razer is primarily a company that engineers and manufactures keyboards and mice. So, the engineering won’t be as innovative or cutting-edge as a company that specializes in audio equipment. The parts used to construct the speaker won’t be as good either since the company isn’t relying on high-fidelity audio equipment to make their name and meet their bottom line.

Spatial Audio Is Not a Replacement for Speaker Placement

While the Razer Leviathan V2 is outfitted with THX Spatial Sound, this type of audio is a digital replication of spatial sound. In other words, the speaker uses software to determine where you should hear the sound from and then alters the output to make it appear to come from that direction. This is similar to a surround sound system, which does the same thing but with multiple speakers placed around the room.

However, THX Spatial Sound can’t replicate the actual, physical spatial placement of speakers, especially with the form factor of a soundbar. With a soundbar, all sounds are coming from directly in front of you, plus or minus a few degrees of distance to the side. In a full surround speaker setup, you have sound physically moved to your sides and around your head.

This factor does not mean that you need a surround sound system worth several grand to get good sound. However, you will experience a difference in spatial sound when using speakers physically placed to your sides compared to a soundbar. With all the sound coming from directly in front of you. Digital spatial sound can’t replicate the physical placement of speakers. The sound is all coming from the same place.

THX Spatial Sound can be a cool feature on headphones. In this case, the spatial sound works alongside the placement of the speakers in the two headphones.

Space Requirements

This soundbar not only requires space for the device itself but also an additional subwoofer. As someone invested in good audio output during their gaming or music listening sessions, I don’t mind having a separate subwoofer on my audio equipment. However, if I’m specifically buying a soundbar, I’m looking to save as much space as I can. So, a separate subwoofer doesn’t fit into that plan.

Further, this soundbar is huge compared to other PC soundbars. It’s around the size of a soundbar designed for use with televisions. However, it’s meant to be used with computers. This device will take up a huge amount of space on your desk compared to a smaller soundbar designed for desks.

Only 2.1 Channels

razer leviathan v2
Having more sound channels allows you to route audio to multiple speakers to change the directional sound.

Additionally, this soundbar only features 2.1 audio channels: the front speakers and the subwoofer. For many people, this configuration will be enough for them. However, at this price point, I’d either want a more robust component collection or more channels. It can be either, but without one, I’d be unwilling to drop this amount of money.

No 3.5mm Auxiliary Jack

Perhaps it makes me sound like a dinosaur in the modern era, but I’m just not sold on digital-only audio signals yet. While there is clear potential to improve audio output quality through using digital signals, the technology isn’t quite there yet. There’s still a lot of interference and feedback when using digital audio signals. This is especially true when using a wired connection like the one on the Razer Leviathan V2.

Now, I could use the soundbar with its Bluetooth connection. However, that presents problems since wireless audio connections can have latency. Even though the technical specifications promise a latency of 60 milliseconds or less, there’s no way to truly guarantee that. Many factors influence a device’s wireless latency. A little bit of latency might not matter when I’m listening to music, but when I’m gaming, I need to hear every sound as soon as it plays. 60 milliseconds could very well be the difference between dodging and getting hit.

How to Pick the Right Soundbar

There are many factors you should consider when choosing a soundbar. Firstly, you should decide on your price range. There’s no point in doing all this research on a soundbar only to find out it’s far more expensive than you intended. 

Then you should consider how much space you have to set up your soundbar. Audio equipment isn’t the type of gear that you can just place anywhere and get the best return. Speakers require proper placement to faithfully reproduce the sounds in the recordings.

Finally, you’ll want to put some thought into what kind of input you want your speaker to have. The most common inputs for speakers are 3.5mm auxiliary, dual RCA, USB, and Bluetooth. Each has merits and downsides. So, choosing the right one for your specific use case is crucial to getting the audio output experience you want.

Soundbar Space Requirements

razer leviathan v2
The Razer Leviathan V2 soundbar is bigger than most desktop ones and more in line with a TV soundbar.

How much space your soundbar will require depends on what soundbar you purchase. However, most audio equipment companies will give you some cursory guidance on how much space your speaker needs to function effectively. If a soundbar doesn’t have configuration information, you’ll need to experiment on your own to find out where it needs to sit to give you the best sound.

You’ll also want to ensure that the soundbar isn’t so tall that it blocks the screen. This issue will mostly arise for people who have low-standing screens and can present with just about any peripheral. However, due to the typical physical placement of soundbars, it’s something to consider heavily, especially if you’re buying a larger soundbar.

Input Interface

You’ll also want to put thought into your soundbar’s input interface. There are four basic types of inputs that you can find on modern soundbars: 3.5 mm auxiliary, dual RCA, USB, and Bluetooth. While they all serve the same basic function, each one has remarkable differences that make actively choosing one important to your experience.

3.5mm auxiliary is the jack you’re probably most familiar with if you’ve been around the block. It’s the standard jack we used to associate with headphones that has largely been phased out in favor of Bluetooth. However, that doesn’t mean that Bluetooth is a better choice, especially for a speaker set.

Bluetooth relies on a digital audio signal, while the 3.5mm auxiliary jack uses an analog one. Analog signals are more equipped to faithfully reproduce sound recordings. Hence, they’re more common in high-fidelity audio equipment than Bluetooth. 

Dual RCA is much less common than the other options as it’s a significantly older technology that has largely been succeeded by 3.5mm auxiliary, USB, and Bluetooth. In terms of experience, there is very little difference between dual RCA and 3.5mm auxiliary.

USB is quickly becoming the standard wired input for computer speakers, although many hi-fi equipment pieces continue to support 3.5mm auxiliary for those who prefer it. However, USB, like Bluetooth, uses a digital audio signal converted to an analog one, creating a second layer of innate interference in the signal that can degrade the output quality.

Often, the choice between inputs is determined by the user’s available space and input. People with less space for additional wires, or more wires in their current setup may prefer a wireless soundbar, even with the latency. However, people more invested in the output quality may choose to make space for a 3.5mm auxiliary or dual RCA soundbar. There’s no right or wrong answer. It’s all about preference and availability.

Alternatives to the Razer Leviathan V2

If you, too, have decided to avoid a Razer Leviathan V2, here are a few of our favorite alternatives.

ELAC Debut 2.0 B6.2 Bookshelf Speakers

Perfect for High-Res Music
ELAC Debut 2.0 B6.2 Bookshelf Speakers
$279.98
  • 1-inch cloth dome tweeter
  • 6.5-inch aramid fiber woofer
  • Up to 35,000Hz frequency response
  • Thick MDF cabinets with internal bracing to cut down on vibrations
  • Front-firing ports
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.
01/30/2024 05:17 pm GMT

The ELAC Debut 2.0 B6.2 bookshelf speakers cost just $30 more than the Leviathan V2 and they come with significantly better equipment. This is a true high-fidelity speaker set with specially-made parts to faithfully reproduce audio recordings.

Bose is an audio engineering company that will impress you with packaging everything you need for high-quality audio into a small, wireless form factor. So if wireless sound is crucial to you, the Bose SoundLink Revolve Series II can deliver wireless audio with reasonably high fidelity.

Redragon GS560 Soundbar and GS520 Anvil Speakers

Best Overall
Redragon GS560 RGB Desktop Soundbar
$34.99
  • Extremely user-friendly plug-and-play design
  • USB-powered 3.5mm audio and mic cables
  • 4 different backlit modes
  • Crisp audio with clear bass due to its dual 4W drivers
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.
01/30/2024 05:27 pm GMT

Redragon’s GS560 soundbar is essentially a cheaper Leviathan clone. It provides dynamic and static LEDs for a fraction of the price. If you don’t need the soundbar form factor, you can get Redragon’s GS520 speaker set, which also has RGB LEDs for significantly less.

Colorful, Powerful Sound
Redragon GS520 Anvil RGB Desktop Speakers
$35.99
  • 2.0 channel stereo speakers
  • Plug-and-play design offers wide compatibility
  • USB powered with 3.5mm cable
  • 6 touch-control LED modes
  • 3W power per speaker
We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.
01/30/2024 05:37 pm GMT

Best Alternatives to the Razer Leviathan V2

1. ELAC Debut 2.0 B6.2 Bookshelf Speakers
2. Bose SoundLink Revolve Series II Speaker
3. Redragon GS560 Soundbar
4. Redragon GS520 Anvil Speakers
  1. ELAC Debut 2.0 B6.2 Bookshelf Speakers
    $279.98
    • 1-inch cloth dome tweeter
    • 6.5-inch aramid fiber woofer
    • Up to 35,000Hz frequency response
    • Thick MDF cabinets with internal bracing to cut down on vibrations
    • Front-firing ports
    Buy on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    01/30/2024 05:17 pm GMT
  2. Redragon GS560 RGB Desktop Soundbar
    $34.99
    • Extremely user-friendly plug-and-play design
    • USB-powered 3.5mm audio and mic cables
    • 4 different backlit modes
    • Crisp audio with clear bass due to its dual 4W drivers
    Buy on Amazon

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    01/30/2024 05:27 pm GMT
  3. Redragon GS520 Anvil RGB Desktop Speakers
    $35.99
    • 2.0 channel stereo speakers
    • Plug-and-play design offers wide compatibility
    • USB powered with 3.5mm cable
    • 6 touch-control LED modes
    • 3W power per speaker
    Buy Now

    We earn a commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you.

    01/30/2024 05:37 pm GMT

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Razer Leviathan V2?

The Razer Leviathan V2 is an ARGB soundbar made by Razer.

How much does the Razer Leviathan V2 cost?

The Razer Leviathan V2 has an MSRP of $249.99.

Is the Razer Leviathan V2 a high-fidelity speaker?

The Razer Leviathan V2 claims to be a high-fidelity speaker, but so do most speakers on Amazon. The components used in the manufacturing process for the soundbar do not denote any special qualities.

Are the Razer Leviathan V2’s RGB LEDs addressable?

Yes, the Razer Leviathan V2 has addressable RGB LEDs with 18 unique LED zones.

Is the Razer Leviathan V2 integrated with Razer Synapse?

Yes, Razer Synapse has integrations for the Leviathan V2,

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